Case Study

Pratibha Syntex Facilities Use Higg Co to Reduce Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in India

Products used

Higg Facility Environmental Module

Problem

In 2016, Pratibha Syntex had big goals. By 2020, they wanted to reduce energy consumption and emissions by large percentages over its baseline. It needed a robust tool to measure, show hotspots, and help them execute on sustainability measures.

Products used

Higg Facility Environmental Module

Solution

Pratibha Syntex uses Higg Co to systematically monitor progress toward its targets, and is already showing results. In 2017, the company’s Higg Facility Environmental Module (Higg FEM) self-assessment indicated a decrease in energy consumption of eight percent per garment produced, compared to baseline the previous year.

Here, we go through a detailed account of how they measured and handled their sustainability changes with Higg Co.

8%

Reduction in energy use per garment produced, 1 year after implementing

180k liters

Reduced use of diesel fuel

40%

Main plant electricity now provided by solar

The Story

A commitment to environmental sustainability is integral to business at Pratibha Syntex Ltd., an apparel manufacturer based in Pithampur, India. “Our mission at Pratibha is to become a global leader in sustainable products and practices,” said Mrinal Bose, sustainability manager at Pratibha Syntex. “We believe that in order to become a sustainable textile manufacturing company, we have to take care of all aspects pertaining to sustainability.”

To stay ahead of the competition and be a leader in sustainability, Pratibha set goals for itself to cut energy spending by 20%, and greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2020, over their baseline year.

Because they implemented the Higg FEM more than four years before, Pratibha Syntex found they had enough data to measure their baseline energy consumption in 2016 and set reduction targets, to reduce the quantity of energy it consumed and greenhouse gas emitted per garment it produced.

Higg FEM guidelines encourage setting normalized targets as this can demonstrate progress thanks to energy reduction, rather than as a result of business changes, such as a decrease in units produced.

Legend

Scope 1 Emissions

Direct emissions from owned or controlled sources. Examples include the emissions produced by gasoline-powered vehicles owned by the company or from coal used in onsite boilers.

Scope 2 Emissions

Indirect emissions from the generation of purchased energy. A common example is purchased electricity delivered through a grid.

Scope 3 Emissions

Include all indirect emissions (not included in scope 2) that occur in the value chain of the reporting company, including both upstream* and downstream** emissions. Sources of scope 3 emissions are diverse.

A Multi-Pronged Approach

Pratibha Syntex continues to use the Higg Index to monitor progress toward its ambitious targets and is already showing results. In 2017, the company’s Higg FEM self-assessment indicated a decrease in energy consumption of eight percent per garment produced, compared to 2016.

Because Pratibha Syntex is targeting reductions in both energy and greenhouse gas emissions, they must improve energy efficiency and reduce carbon intensity. To get there, they’re implementing a multi-pronged approach: several diverse projects aimed at big and small reductions and from scope 1 and 2 emissions sources (see legend, right),  targeting multiple energy sources as well as individual operational systems. In one facility, the company transitioned from a diesel boiler to using biomass briquettes. Because of this, this year Pratibha Syntex expects to reduce diesel use by 180,000 liters.

To tackle scope 2 emissions, Pratibha is implementing onsite renewable energy, as well as energy efficiency and monitoring projects, where solar photovoltaic (PV) power will play a big role.

Smaller impact projects also help: they installed two harmonic frequency monitors and plan for more. While they expect only about two percent energy reduction from this, such projects may have more than one direct benefit. Harmonic frequencies from equipment drawing short bursts of electrical power can cause overheating and fire hazards. By monitoring potential harmonic issues, Pratibha Syntex facilities can correct problems and improve energy efficiency.

Using the Higg Index to Track Progress Over Time

The Higg FEM assessment starts with basic improvements, followed by increasingly advanced impact reduction tactics.

Legend

Scope 1 Emissions

Direct emissions from owned or controlled sources. Examples include the emissions produced by gasoline-powered vehicles owned by the company or from coal used in onsite boilers.

Scope 2 Emissions

Indirect emissions from the generation of purchased energy. A common example is purchased electricity delivered through a grid.

Scope 3 Emissions

Include all indirect emissions (not included in scope 2) that occur in the value chain of the reporting company, including both upstream* and downstream** emissions. Sources of scope 3 emissions are diverse.

To move to the next level of impact reduction, Pratibha Syntex tracks and monitors energy consumption from various sources all in one system and

sees an automatic calculation of its overall energy consumption across all of its facilities (see: energy section in the Higg FEM). The Higg Index illuminates their annual progress with straightforward reduction comparisons based on reported energy quantities.

Pratibha Syntex has already seen a reduction in energy use since 2017 and is planning more projects to meet its 2020 goals. Following the successful reduction of diesel, Pratibha Syntex will also replace a coal boiler later this year. The company will introduce additional harmonics panels and also plans to upgrade its compressed air system to a single, more energy-efficient high-tension compressor to replace its fourteen existing units.

At its main plant, Pratibha Syntex plans to install additional solar energy capacity to bring the solar contribution to 40 percent of electricity consumption. They will upgrade another facility that relies on 100 percent grid electricity with solar panels, generating 25 percent of its electricity. Because the grid mix is carbon-intensive, transitioning to renewable energy will make a significant impact in reducing the company’s scope 2 emissions.

Sustainability Investment Pays for Itself in Business Value and Energy Savings

“[Setting energy and GHG reduction targets] will not only make Pratibha a more responsible business, but also make us more profitable in the long run. This will ensure our business as a whole is more sustainable and competitive.”
— Mrinal Bose, sustainability manager at Pratibha Syntex Ltd

Bose acknowledges that implementing reduction projects can be expensive and that the initial investment is challenging. However, there is an upside. “Savings from energy reductions will become visible over time and projects can pay back in due course,” he said. On top of financial savings, Pratibha Syntex finds that energy and greenhouse gas emissions projects create business value by preparing the company for future changes, and helping it get ahead of competitors on sustainability efforts. Bose also says these projects will lead to improved Higg Index scores, attracting new supply chain business partners.

Aligning with Global Sustainable Development Goals

Pratibha Syntex sought ways to align its operations with the United Nations’ 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Bose says that the company’s use of Higg FEM to report environmental performance and its implementation of improvement efforts demonstrate Pratibha Syntex’s alignment with the SDGs. For Pratibha Syntex, using the Higg FEM to baseline energy consumption and set reduction targets helps them support SDG 13: Climate Action.

Collaboration Helps Us All Succeed

Bose says that pursuing energy and greenhouse gas saving programs will benefit any organization seeking to do business in a more sustainable, responsible, and profitable way. He encourages other companies to consider setting energy reduction targets and establishing sustainability projects. “When organizations achieve results, they can be shared,” he said. “This allows others to implement successful projects, too.”

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